Tree Trimming – Doing It Right

tree trimming

Tree trimming, sometimes called pruning, is a necessary service for homeowners and commercial real estate owners alike. Tree Service, though, generally focuses on more invasive methods of removing branches. Green growth is often encouraged by pruning dead branches or pruning certain portions of a tree to correct structural imbalances. Certain pests and diseases can be addressed with the proper pruning. Tree trimming is a skill that can be learned and perfected over time.

When it comes to tree trimming, certain approaches are common. The primary approach, regardless of which type of professional tree service you use, focuses on removing large branches or treetops. The smaller, livelier branches are usually removed first. Dead branches should also be removed. If trimming is to promote healthier growth overall, professionals will often prune back even dead, broken, or damaged branches.

There are many types of tree removal tools and techniques. Some homeowners prefer to use chain saws, tree pruners, and hedge trimmers while others opt for a bow chipper, claw hammer, or power pruner. Professional tree services will often recommend a specific selection of tools based on your location, shrub species, and preferences. In some cases, these tools may need to be rented in addition to using them on your own.

Some homeowners and landscape specialists choose to remove branches without using any type of mechanical tools at all. This approach, known as “cutting without tools,” may cause damage to surrounding vegetation and structures if not performed correctly. Care must be taken to ensure that no one else is in the area when cutting. Tripping hazards are possible if two people are in the yard at the same time. Also, it can be dangerous to cut trees close to power lines and telephone lines.

Tree pruning is another important part of tree care. Many times, the best way to manage a yard or garden is to thin out overgrown trees. Trees that appear bushy are often removed to allow room for desired shrub species. Thinning can help to deter deer from taking up residence in an area by providing less natural cover. Removing diseased branches may help to prevent disease by reducing the chance that fungi or parasites will thrive in an environment where disease often has a foothold.

When tree trimming, it is important to remember that different parts of the tree should be pruned, depending on how large a branch you are dealing with. You may have to remove a whole branch or even several limbs to accomplish your goals. Sometimes only one branch needs to be trimmed to achieve the desired result. In cases of diseased branches, it may be necessary to remove all or at least a large portion of the branch, especially if the branch poses a threat to other vegetation or the structural support of the home.

The process of removing branches poses particular risks, since branches that grow thicker than 2 feet could fall to the ground instead of staying on top of a roof or building. Falling trees that remain on top may cause damage to a house, roofing structure, or other property. Falling branches that break off from trees may cause serious injury or death if they struck a person or animal outside or fell from an elevated surface. Falling branches that strike a building’s facades or other structures could also create severe structural damage and cause injuries or death if they struck a person inside the building.

Tree pruning can be done in many different ways. Small cuts can be made in a tree when it is young so that it will grow larger and healthier before you trim it. However, this can’t always be done, since some tree species cannot be grown in smaller areas or with small cuttings. In such cases, more invasive methods such as cutting old canopies and limbs so that new growth will take over may be necessary. If you have a large tree, you should always wait until the dormant season is over and trim your tree accordingly.